Gardening — It does a body good

Getting ready to start pulling weeds

Volunteering at Vegas Roots Community Garden

I have always had a fondness for gardening.  My fondness, however, has not always meant that I have had a green thumb.  Nor has it meant that I have had time and space for gardening.  There have been times when I was privileged to have some space for gardening, and I miss those times.  I miss the work, as hard as it may be occasionally.  I miss the fresh vegetables too.

Apartment life does not allow for much gardening.  I attempted a container garden on my patio. I planted a yellow squash, a zucchini, and a pepper plant.  I used organic soil and no yucky pesticides.  They attracted bugs and died.  Needless to say, I was quite disappointed.  I was truly looking forward to having my own fresh veggies again.

Enter Vegas Roots Community Garden.  It took a family member’s wrong turn for us to find this place.  Really.  They were heading somewhere else, took a wrong turn, and happened upon the Community Garden.  That wrong turn wasn’t really a wrong turn after all. It took us a couple weeks to have the actual time due to scheduling to check the place out, but we finally did it.

We arrived at Vegas Roots Community Garden around 10:00 in the morning. It’s mid-July so I was thinking it is really hot for anything to grow right now in the Las Vegas desert climate.  But the Garden was bursting with vegetation.  We walked through the several rows of vegetables, fruits and herbs, noting how abundant this spot is—in spite of the heat and dry climate.  Vegas Roots Community Garden touts itself as the first and only urban farm in Las Vegas (About Vegas Roots, 2014). The Garden has about 4 acres of land with several rows of “You-Pick” items, and many “private” plots.  For a nominal fee, one may rent a 50 square foot plot for planting practically anything they can tend.  Their website has more information.  We found this place to have an inviting atmosphere, and volunteered to work on the spot.

Although it was close to 100 degrees, we spent the better part of almost two hours pulling weeds, and harvesting overripe fruits and veggies.  (It was our first time out and we are just beginning to work on our fitness, with this garden being one of our avenues.)  We harvested some tomatoes—they are abundant right now at the Community Garden—some basil, and peppers.  They were beautiful; see pictures below.

We really enjoyed our time working in the garden.  It is so rewarding to do this type of work, for many reasons.  And as Vegas Roots’ website says, science has proven that gardening is good for us. We plan to be out there on a regular basis each week, and as our schedules allow.  We are also looking forward to attending some of their other events in the future.

I highly recommend visiting Vegas Roots Community Garden.  You will find friendly staff and volunteers, along with fresh local produce.  If you are so inclined, you might even rent a garden plot or volunteer your time.  It is worth the visit.

Getting it done, even in the heat.

Getting it done, even in the heat.

Keeping weeds out keeps plants healthy.

Keeping weeds out keeps plants healthy.

Paused for a selfie.  (It is important to note how happy we are to be working in the garden.)

Paused for a selfie. (It is important to note how happy we are to be working in the garden.)

Our handiwork.

Our handiwork.

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We harvested overripe tomatoes and pulled weeds from around these rows.

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Our tomatoes, basil and peppers.   Beautiful and delicious.

Our tomatoes, basil and peppers. Beautiful and delicious.

Reference:

About Vegas Roots. (2014). Retrieved from Vegas Roots Community Garden: http://vegasroots.org/about-us/#sthash.bC8Qj5kh.dpbs

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This entry was posted in Agriculture, Education, Las Vegas, Public Health, Science, Sustainability and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Gardening — It does a body good

  1. Pingback: Gardening — It does a body good | nrdgrlsciencescoop | WORLD ORGANIC NEWS

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